Which is better microcurrent or RF?

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microcurrent

There is a lot of confusion about whether or not microcurrent or RF are better for muscle recovery. Here you will learn about the risks, benefits, and how to get started with either method.

Microcurrents (or electrotherapy) have been around for hundreds of years and can still be seen in places like hospitals as an alternative treatment. It has recently gained popularity as a low-impact home treatment option for pain relief, including muscle soreness and stress reduction. Microcurrent therapy uses weak electrical currents that travel through the muscles to increase blood flow; therefore providing enhanced circulation and preventing physical damage during exercise. 

What is electrotherapy, microcurrents, or electric muscle stimulation?

microcurrents (or electrotherapy) have been around for hundreds of years and can still be seen in places like hospitals as an alternative treatment. It has recently gained popularity as a low-impact home treatment option for pain relief, lumbuy including muscle soreness and stress reduction. Microcurrent therapy uses weak electrical currents that travel through the muscles to increase blood flow; therefore providing enhanced circulation and preventing physical damage during exercise.

What is the difference between microcurrent and RF ?

RF is a newer approach to electrotherapy that has also been gaining popularity. The difference between the two is in how they work. Microcurrents work through low intensity DC current, where RF works through high frequency AC current. The higher frequency of the RF option allows for deeper penetration than the microcurrents (less than an 1/16″ thick). Some people like this for pain relief; however it does not work well for circulation so should not be used if you want to increase your muscle mass.

Are microcurrents safe for everyone?

Most of the studies done on microcurrents have used a low-voltage setting, and have not described any potential negative side effects (pain, redness, breaks in the skin). It is important to note that if you have any medical conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure, then you should speak with your doctor before starting. In addition, it is possible to get too much voltage (a burn) when using the microcurrents. If you feel anything unusual around pins or needles that were not painful, be sure to discontinue use.

What are the risks of microcurrents?

From the information currently available, microcurrents seem to be a safe and effective treatment. As mentioned above, you suldho talk with your doctor if you have any medical conditions, or if you are pregnant. High voltage may result in burns or electrical shock. Again, this risk is minimal and rare as long as the amount of electricity used is not too high. The same precaution applies if you have a pacemaker or any other device that uses electricity to work correctly; again speak with your physician before using.

 Are microcurrents and RF interchangeable?

Microcurrents are known to improve circulation and are commonly used for this purpose. They do so by promoting blood flow – the moving of blood throughout the body. RF, on the other hand, is known to cause muscle contraction which would work against a person’s goal to increase circulation.

What is meant by low-frequency DC microcurrent therapy?

DC stands for direct current and refers to direct electron flow between two points – positive and negative at a constant voltage. Usually with microcurrents, there would be an alternating (AC) current which changes directions rapidly, in other words it “alternates” between positive and negative charges. A frequency of less than 1kHz is considered low-frequency DC current. 

Why do some machines say “low-frequency” and others say “high frequency”?

The terms low-frequency and high frequency simply refer to the frequency of the electrical current used for treatment.  High frequency is used for treatment of muscle injuries or pain. Low-frequency DC microcurrent therapy is used for pain relief, circulation, stretching and relaxation.

Conclusion

Experiences with microcurrents have been highly varied and it is important to discuss with a professional before and after you start. Both RF and microcurrents are available and clinical studies have shown that both have similar benefits. The major difference between the two methods is that RF can be used by anyone while microcurrents require a qualified professional to treat you.

 

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